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Race Cards, Odds & Results Wed 22nd Sep

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  1. 23:00 - Penn National, 1m
  2. 23:27 - Penn National, 1m 70y
  3. 23:54 - Penn National, 6f
  4. 00:00 - Charles Town, 6f 110y
  5. 00:00 - Mountaineer, 7f
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  1. 21:45 - Delaware Park, 6f
  2. 21:33 - Finger Lakes, 6f
  3. 21:15 - Delaware Park, 1m 110y
  4. 21:05 - Belterra Park, 6f
  5. 21:04 - Finger Lakes, 1m 70y
Goodwood
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  2. 13:15 - 1m 1f 197y (7 ran)
  3. 13:45 - 1m (10 ran)
  4. 14:17 - 6f (6 ran)
  5. 14:52 - 1m 1f 197y (7 ran)
  6. 15:27 - 1m 6f (9 ran)
  7. 16:02 - 1m 1f 11y (14 ran)
  8. 16:35 - 5f (7 ran)
Kempton
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  2. 16:40 - 1m (13 ran)
  3. 17:15 - 1m (12 ran)
  4. 17:45 - 7f (12 ran)
  5. 18:15 - 6f (10 ran)
  6. 18:45 - 6f (11 ran)
  7. 19:15 - 1m 2f 219y (5 ran)
  8. 19:45 - 1m 3f 219y (13 ran)
  9. 20:15 - 6f (12 ran)
Perth
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  2. 13:52 - 2m 4f 35y (8 ran)
  3. 14:25 - 2m 4f 20y (8 ran)
  4. 15:00 - 2m 7f 207y (7 ran)
  5. 15:35 - 2m 7f 180y (4 ran)
  6. 16:10 - 2m 4f 35y (6 ran)
  7. 16:45 - 2m (7 ran)
  8. 17:20 - 2m 4f 35y (10 ran)
  9. 17:55 - 2m 4f 35y (9 ran)
Redcar
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  2. 13:00 - 5f 217y (9 ran)
  3. 13:30 - 7f 219y (16 ran)
  4. 14:00 - 7f (6 ran)
  5. 14:35 - 1m 2f 1y (8 ran)
  6. 15:10 - 7f 219y (5 ran)
  7. 15:45 - 5f 217y (12 ran)
  8. 16:20 - 5f 217y (12 ran)
  9. 16:53 - 5f (16 ran)
Listowel (IRE)
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  2. 13:40 - 2m (10 ran)
  3. 14:10 - 2m (13 ran)
  4. 14:45 - 2m (7 ran)
  5. 15:20 - 3m (17 ran)
  6. 15:55 - 2m 4f (5 ran)
  7. 16:25 - 3m (18 ran)
  8. 17:00 - 2m 6f (12 ran)
  9. 17:35 - 2m 4f (12 ran)
Amiens (France)
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  2. 10:55 - 1m 3f 204y (12 ran)
  3. 11:31 - 1m 6f 91y (11 ran)
  4. 12:05 - 1m 3f 204y (10 ran)
  5. 12:50 - 1m 3f 204y (14 ran)
  6. 13:25 - 1m 6f 91y (15 ran)
  7. 14:00 - 1m 3f 204y (8 ran)
  8. 14:35 - 1m 6f 91y (10 ran)
  9. 15:10 - 1m 3f 204y (10 ran)
Greyville (RSA)
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  2. 11:30 - 7f 210y (11 ran)
  3. 12:05 - 7f 210y (8 ran)
  4. 12:40 - 1m 1f 98y (8 ran)
  5. 13:20 - 1m 99y (11 ran)
  6. 13:55 - 1m 99y (10 ran)
  7. 14:30 - 6f 211y (7 ran)
  8. 15:05 - 6f 211y (11 ran)
  9. 15:40 - 6f 211y (12 ran)
Happy Valley (Hong Kong)
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  2. 12:15 - 1m 1f (8 ran)
  3. 12:45 - 1m (10 ran)
  4. 13:15 - 1m (12 ran)
  5. 13:45 - 5f (11 ran)
  6. 14:15 - 6f (12 ran)
  7. 14:45 - 5f (10 ran)
  8. 15:15 - 1m 1f (11 ran)
  9. 15:50 - 6f (12 ran)
Saint-Cloud (France)
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  2. 13:07 - 7f 100y (6 ran)
  3. 13:42 - 6f 101y (15 ran)
  4. 14:17 - 7f 209y (7 ran)
  5. 14:52 - 1m 4f 94y (8 ran)
  6. 15:27 - 7f 209y (9 ran)
  7. 16:02 - 1m 2f 96y (12 ran)
  8. 16:37 - 1m 3f 204y (13 ran)
  9. 17:12 - 1m 3f 204y (12 ran)
Toulouse (France)
  1. ALL - View all races at this meeting
  2. 15:45 - 1m 6f 146y (11 ran)
  3. 16:20 - 1m 2f 151y (15 ran)
  4. 16:55 - 1m 5f 147y (13 ran)
  5. 17:30 - 1m 6f 146y (10 ran)
  6. 18:00 - 1m 5f 147y (12 ran)
  7. 18:30 - 1m 6f 146y (10 ran)
  8. 19:00 - 1m 5f 147y (16 ran)
  9. 19:30 - 1m 3f 122y (13 ran)
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Belterra Park (USA)
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  2. R1 (17:35) - 6f (5 ran)
  3. R2 (18:05) - 1m (5 ran)
  4. R3 (18:35) - 6f (6 ran)
  5. R4 (19:05) - 5f (6 ran)
  6. R5 (19:35) - 5f (5 ran)
  7. R6 (20:05) - 6f (5 ran)
  8. R7 (20:35) - 6f (8 ran)
  9. R8 (21:05) - 6f (10 ran)
Charles Town (USA)
  1. ALL - View all races at this meeting
  2. R1 (00:00) - 6f 110y (5 run)
  3. R2 (00:30) - 4f 110y (6 run)
  4. R3 (00:57) - 4f 110y (6 run)
  5. R4 (01:25) - 6f 110y (6 run)
  6. R5 (01:53) - 4f 110y (7 run)
  7. R6 (02:21) - 4f 110y (5 run)
  8. R7 (02:49) - 7f (6 run)
  9. R8 (03:17) - 7f (6 run)
Delaware Park (USA)
  1. ALL - View all races at this meeting
  2. R1 (18:15) - 1m 110y (5 ran)
  3. R2 (18:45) - 6f (5 ran)
  4. R3 (19:15) - 1m 70y (6 ran)
  5. R4 (19:45) - 1m 110y (6 ran)
  6. R5 (20:15) - 1m (8 ran)
  7. R6 (20:45) - 1m (7 ran)
  8. R7 (21:15) - 1m 110y (6 ran)
  9. R8 (21:45) - 6f (7 ran)
Finger Lakes (USA)
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  2. R1 (18:10) - 1m 70y (7 ran)
  3. R2 (18:39) - 6f (7 ran)
  4. R3 (19:08) - 1m 70y (6 ran)
  5. R4 (19:37) - 6f (9 ran)
  6. R5 (20:06) - 6f (6 ran)
  7. R6 (20:35) - 6f (9 ran)
  8. R7 (21:04) - 1m 70y (7 ran)
  9. R8 (21:33) - 6f (8 ran)
Mountaineer (USA)
  1. ALL - View all races at this meeting
  2. R1 (00:00) - 7f (9 run)
  3. R2 (00:25) - 7f (6 run)
  4. R3 (00:50) - 6f (7 run)
  5. R4 (01:15) - 5f (9 run)
  6. R5 (01:40) - 1m (7 run)
  7. R6 (02:05) - 1m (7 run)
  8. R7 (02:30) - 6f (8 run)
  9. R8 (02:55) - 5f 110y (7 run)
Penn National (USA)
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  2. R1 (23:00) - 1m (5 run)
  3. R2 (23:27) - 1m 70y (6 run)
  4. R3 (23:54) - 6f (4 run)
  5. R4 (00:22) - 6f (7 run)
  6. R5 (00:49) - 6f (5 run)
  7. R6 (01:16) - 1m (7 run)
  8. R7 (01:43) - 6f (6 run)
  9. R8 (02:10) - 6f (7 run)
Remington Park (USA)
  1. ALL - View all races at this meeting
  2. R1 (01:07) - 5f 110y (7 run)
  3. R2 (01:35) - 5f 110y (10 run)
  4. R3 (02:03) - 6f (8 run)
  5. R4 (02:31) - 7f (6 run)
  6. R5 (02:59) - 6f 110y (7 run)
  7. R6 (03:27) - 7f 110y (7 run)
  8. R7 (03:55) - 6f (7 run)
  9. R8 (04:23) - 5f 110y (10 run)
  10. R9 (04:51) - 5f (8 run)
Thistledown (USA)
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  2. R1 (17:50) - 2f (6 ran)
  3. R2 (18:20) - 6f (6 ran)
  4. R3 (18:50) - 6f (7 ran)
  5. R4 (19:20) - 6f (10 ran)
  6. R5 (19:50) - 6f (6 ran)
  7. R6 (20:20) - 1m 39y (5 ran)
  8. R7 (20:50) - Abandoned
  9. R8 (21:20) - Abandoned
Yonkers Harness (USA)
  1. ALL - View all races at this meeting
  2. R1 (00:15) - 1m (8 run)
  3. R2 (00:35) - 1m (6 run)
  4. R3 (00:55) - 1m (8 run)
  5. R4 (01:15) - 1m (7 run)
  6. R5 (01:35) - 1m (8 run)
  7. R6 (01:55) - 1m (8 run)
  8. R7 (02:15) - 1m (8 run)
  9. R8 (02:35) - 1m (8 run)
  10. R9 (02:55) - 1m (8 run)
  11. R10 (03:15) - 1m (8 run)

2020 Tokyo Olympics Betting Guide
23 Jul 2021

By David Myers 

Dates: 23 July - 8 Aug 2021; Host: Tokyo, Japan; Weather: Sunny & thunderstorms, 29℃: Coverage: BBC One

The 2020 Summer Olympics gets underway in Tokyo on 23 July when the opening ceremony marks the start of what promises to be a pulsating 16 days of sporting action, ranging from athletics to rowing, cycling to swimming, while even horse fans get a fix following the equestrian. There really is something for everyone, with punters seeking another dose of football, golf and tennis also well catered for.

Despite no spectators being allowed owing to the pandemic, the main priority is the athletes remain safe and well during the Games, which never fails to deliver a few shocks and surprises - in fact, the first shock took place on Wednesday when the red-hot favourites USA in the Women's Football lost their 44-match unbeaten run; more on that later.

With so many sports set to take place in Tokyo, the following betting guide concentrates on the main events, along with those where GB & NI athletes could pick up a medal and in which betting markets are available  - for instance, Max Whitlock looks good in the gymnastics, but odds aren't yet available (it's been a busy summer for the bookies!)

But, before wading into each event and looking at the key events and odds, here are five potential fiery battles to whet the appetite, including several where Great Britain could be bringing it home...

FIVE OLYMPIC RINGS OF FIRE...

ROWING - Men's Coxless Four, 28 July 
Great Britain v Australia - Team GB took the last three golds with Australia taking silver on each occasion, while drawing closer - game on.

BOXING - Welterweight, 3 August
Pat McCormack (GB) v Andrey Zamkovoy (RUS) - Forget Fury v Wilder, a potential third clash, where the score currently stands at 1-1, could be the fight of 2021.

ATHLETICS - Women's 100m, 31 July
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce v Elaine Thompson-Herah - A much-anticipated clash between the last two Olympic 100m champions, and neither will give an inch.

RUGBY 7's - Men's, 28 July
New Zealand v Fiji - The All Blacks lost to Fiji in Rio and again this year, but will want revenge against a country for whom winning gold once more would mean everything.

TENNIS - Women's Singles, 31 July-1 August
Naomi Osaka v Ashleigh Barty - The top two in the world both go for gold - will it be the Face of the Olympics or the newly-crowned Wimbledon champion who triumphs?

ATHLETICS

Men's 100m

Dates: 31 Jul - 1 Aug

Odds: 6-5 Trayvon Bromell (US); 4-1 Ronnie Baker (US); 11-2Akani Simbine (RSA); 6-1 Andre De Graase (CAN); 14-1 Fred Kerley (US); 20-1 Marcel Jacobs (ITA); 25-1 Zharnel Hughes (GB)

Previous 100m winners

2016

Usain Bolt (JAM)

9.81s

2012

Usain Bolt (JAM)

9.63s

2008

Usain Bolt (JAM)

9.69s

2004

Justin Gatlin (US)

9.85s

2000

Maurice Greene (US)

9.87s

1996

Donovan Bailey (CAN)

9.84s

1992

Linford Christie (GB)

9.96s

1988

Carl Lewis (US)

9.92s *Ben Johnson disqualified

1984

Carl Lewis (US)

9.99s

 Fastest times - 2021

1

Trayvon Bromell

9.77s

05 Jun

2

Akani Simbine

9.84s

06 Jul

3

Marvin Bracy

9.85s

05 Jun

4

Ronnie Baker

9.85s

20 Jun

5

Fred Kerley

9.86s

20 Jun

Historically one of the marquee events of the Summer Olympics, the 100m remains one of the must-see races and continues to leave its mark in the history books - Usain Bolt doing just that when landing gold during the last three renewals. While no Bolt races this time around, there is again an abundance of speed on show who'll battle it out to become the fastest man on the planet. 

This will be the first time an Olympic 100m final takes place without Usain Bolt since 2004, when the winner on that occasion was American Justin Gatlin. Amazingly, at the age of 39, Gatlin will be taking his chance in Tokyo, where we will see a new gold medallist on the podium.

The man fancied to replace Bolt at the top of the sprinting world is Trayvon Bromell, who won 11 of his 12 races this year. His only defeat came when fluffing his lines at the start before finishing fifth in Monaco on 9 July where Ronnie Baker took the honours - Bromell's first defeat since 2019. He bounced back when winning four days later at Gateshead and will be keen to put right his last place-finish in the 2016 Olympic final when injuries were an issue, as they were in the following few years.

Trayvon Bromell (white vest) beat Ronnie Baker in landing the U.S. Trials

Bromell has kept the faith and turned things around, and the fact the 2020 Olympics has been delayed a year works in his favour as he's getting stronger. He still seeks a first major medal having been injured during the 2019 World Championships when fellow countryman Christian Coleman took gold - Gatlin took silver - and knows he has a good opportunity in Tokyo as he's beaten all those who'll line-up alongside him.

Of the dangers to Bromell, Akani Simbine recorded an African best of 9.84s in Hungary on 6 July before losing his first race of the year as runner-up in Monaco - the race in which Bromell was fifth - but will need to pull out a career best to get past the American. As for the winner in Monaco, Ronnie Baker, then he'll also need to improve on his second behind Bromell at June's US Trials when trailing by 0.05s.

Meanwhile, Great Britain's big hope comes via Zarnel Hughes, who won the 2018 European title, but is still short of the elite, as demonstarted during his last race in Gateshead when third to Bromell (0.15s). Hughes' time may come, but it won't be in Tokyo.

It will also be good to see the experienced pair Yohan Blake and Justin Gatlin in Tokyo, but neither threatened the fastest times in 2021 and will be hoping for a final slot at best.

VERDICT:

They all have to beat American TRAYVON BROMELL, who'll be looking to wrestle the sprinting power back to the United States following a decade of Jamaican domination, and he looks well worth his odds of 6-5 to take gold.

Others Team GB's to watch:
Men's 110m Hurdles - Andrew Pozzi
Men's 1500m - Josh Kerr
Men's Marathon - Callum Hawkins

Women's 100m & 200m

Dates: 30 Jul - 3 Aug

100m odds: 10-11 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM), 17-10 Elaine Thompson-Herah (JAM), 11-2 Dina Asher-Smith (GB), 9-1 Shericka Jackson (JAM), 9-1 Blessing Okagbare (NGR), 9-1 Marie-Josee Ta Lou, 40-1 bar.

200m odds: 6-4 Gabrielle Thomas (USA), 3-1 Shanau Miller-Uibo (BAH), 4-1 Dina Asher-Smith (GBR), 9-2 Elaine Thompson (JAM), 6-1 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM), 6-1  Shericka Jackson (JAM), 16-1 bar.

 Previous 100m winners

2016

Elaine Thompson (JAM)

10.71s

2012

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM)

10.75s

2008

Shelly-Ann Fraser (JAM)

10.78s

2004

Yulia Nestsiarenka (BLR)

10.93s

2000

Ekaterni Thanou (GRE)

11.12s *Marion Jones disqualified

Fastest 100m times - 2021

1

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

10.63s

05 Jun

2

Elaine Thompson-Herah

10.71s

06 Jul

3

Sha'Carri Richardson

10.72s

10 Apr

4

Shericka Jackson

10.77s

25 Jun

5

Marie-Josee Ta Lou

10.86s

06 Jul

9

Dina Asher-Smith

10.91s

26 Jun

 Previous 200m winners

2016

Elaine Thompson (JAM)

21.78s

2012

Allyson Felix (USA)

21.88s

2008

Veronica Campbell-Brown (JAM)

21.74s

2004

Veronica Campbell (JAM)

22.05s

2000

Pauline Davis-Thompson (BAH)

22.27s

 Fastest 200m times - 2021

1

Gabrielle Thomas

21.61s

26 Jun

2

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

21.79s

27 Jun

3

Shericka Jackson

21.82s

27 Jun

4

Jenna Prandini

21.89s

26 Jun

5

Anavia Battle

21.92s

26 Jun

9

Dina Asher-Smith

22.06s

10 Jun

All eyes in Britain will be on Dina Asher-Smith to see if the 25-year-old can get amongst the sprint medals.

The Londoner picked up a bronze in the 100m relays at the 2016 games to go with her fine collection of medals from the world championships, including a 200m gold, 100m silver and relay silvers. But, Olympic gold is what she'll want, and there are two opportunities in the 100m and 200m, though she'll need to be at her very best against the army of American and Jamaican sprinters.

Old rivals Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Elaine Thompson-Herah are set to do battle once more, with the latter currently holding both the 100m and 200m crowns from Rio in 2016. The times recorded this year, however, suggest Thompson-Herah's best chance will come in the 100m where she clocked the second-fastest earlier this month when narrowly beating Fraser-Pryce by 0.11s, in the process recording a PB. Fraser-Pryce had one month earlier recorded the second-fastest time in history at 10.63s, so their clash in Tokyo will be one of the most-awaited races of the games.

Asher-Smith meanwhile, will be hoping to peak as she has plenty to catch up with on the clock this year, while the 200m final promises to be tougher than her Worlds triumph where both Fraser-Pryce and Thompson-Herah were absent. There is also the small matter of America's Gabrielle Thomas, who like Fraser-Pryce in the 100m earlier this year, recorded the second-fastest 200m time ever. Having only won two of her eight races in 2019 when clocking a fastest time of 22.69s, Thomas has now won nine of her next 10, with her times getting faster - 22.93, 22.12, 21.98, 21.94 & 21.61s  Her nearest rival in the betting is Shanau Miller-Uibo, who has yet to dip below 22 seconds in five outings this year.

VERDICT:

The winners of the last three Olympic 100m golds lock horns once more in Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (2012 & 2008) and Elaine Thompson-Herah (2016), and not much will split them come 31 July. In the 200m, GABRIELLE THOMAS is the improver whose times are getting faster throughout 2021.

Other Team GB's to watch:
Womens 100m hurdles - Tiffany Porter and Cindy Sember
Womens 1500m - Laura Muir
Women's Pole Vault - Holly Bradshaw
Womens Heptathlon - Katarina Johnson-Thompson

BOXING

Men's 63-69kg - Welterweight

Dates: 24 July - 3 August

Odds: Evens Pat McCormack (GB); 2-1 Andrey Zamkovoy (RUS); 9-2 Roniel Iglesias (CUB); 10-1 Ablaikhan Zhussupov (KAZ), Bobo-Usman Boturov (UZB), 22-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Welterweight winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Kazakhstan

Uzbekistan

France & Morocco

2012

Kazakhstan

Great Britain

Russia & Ukraine

2008

Kazakhstan

Cuba

China & South Korea

2004

Kazakhstan

Cuba

South Korea & Russia

2000

Russia

Ukraine

Moldova & Romania

 With Fred Evans taking silver at the 2012 London Olympics, Sunderland's Pat McCormack will be looking to go one further in Tokyo - just as Ireland's Michael Carruth did when landing gold in 1992.

McCormack has already amassed plenty of medals, including Commonwealth gold in 2018 and another gold at the European qualifiers beating Andrey Zamkovoy, whom he lost to only on cuts in the 2019 World Championships final. McCormack learned from that loss in June, though, and finished with a fast flurry of punches that left the Russian without an answer. He'll be more experienced at the Olympics this time around, having lost in the Rio heats as a light welterweight in 2016, and as a southpaw who boxes smartly, he can again see off the 34-year-old Zamkovoy - only the 32-year-old Roniel Iglesias, who took the 2012 Olympic gold as light welterweight but wasn't as effective up at welterweight in 2016 (he also sustained a wrist injury in 2019), remains a danger.

VERDICT:

A great opportunity for another British gold with the improving 26-year-old PAT MCCORMACK, who arrives in confident mood having landed last month's European gold. He should have too much for his older rivals.

Women's 69-75kg - Middleweight

Dates: 28 July - 6 August

Odds: 11-10 Lauren Price (GBR), 3-1 Qian Li (CHN), 7-2 Nouchka Fontjin (NED), 6-1 Zemifira Magomedalieva (RUS), 9-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Women's Middleweight winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

USA

Netherlands

China/Kazakhstan

2012

USA

Russia

China/Kazakhstan

Inaugural event in 2012

Lauren Price will be Wales' first female boxer at the Olympics, while also looking to follow in the footsteps of Britain's double Olympic champion Nicola Adams.

Britain's Lauren Price (blue) is the bookies' favourite to win Middleweight gold in Tokyo

The 27-year-old is an amazing all-rounder with a successful football career with Cardiff City and as a kickboxer, she has now picked up boxing gold at the 2018 Commonwealth Games, prior to European gold and World Championships golds in 2019. Price is very fast and tactically astute, which saw her get the better of the tall Zemifira Magomedalieva with an unanimous decision in the recent Olympic qualifiers, while she also beat the Netherlands' Nouchka Fontjin in a split decision in 2019, having lost to her twice previously. Those two rivlas be present in Tokyo, along with China;'s Qian Li, who took bronze at 2016 games, before a 2018 gold at world championships.

VERDICT:

There won't be much between the first four in the betting, who have all crossed paths down the years and avenged previous defeats. Lauren Price is enjoying a winning run of 15 straight victories and will be confident, but so is Qian Li, who is 13 unbeaten. Will be great to watch, but too tough for a confident wager.

Other Team GB's to watch:
Kellie Harrington Ireland & Caroline Dubois GBR in the Lightweight

CYCLING

Men's Mountain Bike Cross Country Race

Date: 26 July

Odds: Evens Matthieu Van Der Poel (NED), 7-4 Tom Pidcock (GBR), 13-2 Mathias Flueckiger (SUI), 14-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Cross Country winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Switzerland

Czech Rep

Spain

2012

Czech Rep

Switzerland

Italy

2008

France

France

Switzerland

2004

France

Spain

Netherlands

2000

France

Belgium

Switzerland

Men's Team Sprint

Date: 3 August

Odds: 4-11 Netherlands, 11-2 Great Britain, 7-1 France, 17-2 Australia, 10-1 New Zealand, 25-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Team Sprint winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Great Britain

New Zealand

France

2012

Great Britain

France

Germany

2008

Great Britain

France

Germany

2004

Germany

Japan

France

2000

France

Great Britain

Australia

Men's Team Pursuit

Date: 3 Aug- 4 Aug

Odds: 8-11 Denmark, 11-2 New Zealand, 13-2 Australia, 7-1 Great Britain, 10-1 bar.  

Previous Olympic Team Pursuit winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Great Britain

Australia

Denmark

2012

Great Britain

Australia

New Zealand

2008

Great Britain

Denmark

New Zealand

2004

Australia

Great Britain

Spain

2000

Germany

Ukraine

Great Britain

Tom Pidcock faces the task of trying to become Team GB's first winner of the Cross Country event, and his 7-4 odds suggest he may create history. Standing in his way is the current evens favourite, Matthieu Van Der Poel, who won this year's UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships - his fourth - before wearing the yellow jersey in the recent Tour De France. Meanwhile, Pidcock took the 2020 and 2019 National Championships prior to scooping the UCI Mountain Bike World Championships, and then silver behind the Dutchman at the 2020 UCI Cyclo-Cross World Championships. The issue could be Pidcock's form, though, as he broke his collarbone, and while only out for six days, it was still a setback.

In the Team Sprint and Team Pursuits, Jason Kenny is seeking to topple Sir Chris Hoy in passing six gold medals for Team GB in what will be his fourth Olympics. A lack of international competition owing to the pandemic could be an issue - as it will for his rivals - and he and wife Laura (also competing) will have to leave four-year-old son Albie behind, so it will prove to be a different Olympics altogether. Kenny knows how to peak, however, and will want to give all in his final appearance, but his team still need to overcome a strong Netherlands unit who won the last three World Championships, including when beating Team GB into second last year.

Women's Road Race

Date: 26 July

Odds: 13-5 Anna van der Breggen (NED), Annemiek Van Vleuten (NED), 7-2 Marianne Vos (NED), 8-1 Demi Vollering, 10-1 Lizzie Deignan (GBR), 10-1 Elisa Longo Borhini, 14-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Road Race winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Netherlands

Sweden

Italy

2012

Netherlands

Great Britain

Russia

2008

Great Britain

Sweden

Italy

2004

Australia

Germany

Russia

2000

Netherlands

Germany

Lithuania

Women's Team Pursuit

Date: 3 August

Odds: 8-11 USA, 8-5 Great Britain, 9-2 Australia, 14-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Team Pursuit winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Great Britain

United States

Canada

2012

Great Britain

United States

Canada

 Inaugural event in 2012

In the road race, Lizzie Deignan was silver medallist in 2012 and fifth in Rio five years ago, but tackles a tough Dutch team featuring Anna van der Breggen (2016 Olympic champion), Annemiek van Vleuten, Marianne Vos and Demi Vollering - the first three in the betting. Deignan will want to win that elusive gold, but literally has more than a mountain to climb at 10-1 - however, some punters may be tempted about 5-2 for a medal.

In the Team Pursuit, the USA seek to finally get in front of Team GB after notching silver behind them during the last two Olympics, and winning four of the last World Championships since 2016, including in 2020 when Team GB took silver (as they did at the last three Worlds). It's not surprising therefore, that the bookies have USA as 8-11 jollies, with the Brits 8-5. Laura Kenny, will play a key part in the team, and her Olympic record of 4 medals from 4 events will be a huge boost, though she will also be competing in the Madison and Ominum (no odds available), won by Laura Trott in 2016 and 2012.

VERDICT:

Despite Team GB's sparkling record at the Olympics during the last few decades, it could be tougher this time around with no Chris Boardman, Chris Hoy or Bradley Wiggins to steer the ship. While that may sound harsh considering the talent Team GB boast, it's worth noting that other countries like the Netherlands have simply caught up. The women's also had to deal with disruption behind the scenes involving coaches. Probably best to cheer on the GB cyclists rather than punt on them.

Women's BMX Freestyle

Date: 31 July

Odds: 4-11 Hannah Roberts, 8-1 Perris Benegas, 9-1 Charlotte Worthington, 10-1 Nikita Ducarroz.

Previous BMX World Championships winners  

Year Gold Silver Bronze
2021 Hannah Roberts (US) Nikita Ducarroz (SUI) Charlotte Worthington (GB)
2020 Not held
  •  
  •  
2019 Hannah Roberts (US) Macarana Perez Grasset (CHL) Charlotte Worthington (GB)
2018 Perris Benegas (US) Angie Marino (US) Hannah Roberts (US)
2017 Hannah Roberts (US) Lara Marie Lessmann (GER) Angie Marino (US)

Making it's debut at this year's Olympics - BMX Racing was added in 2008 - BMX Freestyle's popularity could increase during the coming weeks owing to Great Britain's Charlotte Worthington. The 25-year-old  from Manchester took the bronze at the last two World Championships, finishing behind three-time champion, Hannah Roberts - a mere 19-year-old, who turns 20 a few days after the Closing Ceremony.

VERDICT:

Hannah Roberts is without doubt the one to beat as she boasts key experience and titles, including three World Cups to accompany three world titles, and hasn't peaked yet according to some of the new flips she's set to try in Tokyo. Charlotte Worthington will need to find a few tricks of her own to dismantle Roberts as the world's best, but she's certainly capable having performed the only front flip at June's Worlds.

DIVING

Men's 10m Platform & 10m Synchronized

Dates: 26 Jul - 7 Aug

Odds:
10m Platform: 5-6 Yang Jian (CHN), 2-1 Cao Yuan (CHN), 4-1 Tom Daley (GBR), 14-1 Aleksander Bondar (RUS).
10m Synchronized: 1-7 China, 5-1 Great Britain, 9-1 Russia, 25-1 Canada.

Previous Olympic 10m Platform winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

China

Mexico

USA

2012

USA

China

Great Britain

2008

Australia

China

Russia

2004

China

Australia

China

2000

China

China

Russia

Previous Olympic 10m Synchronized winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

China

USA

Great Britain

2012

China

Mexico

USA

2008

China

Germany

Russia

2004

China

Great Britain

Australia

2000

Russia

China

Germany

Mention diving to sports fans in Britain and one name comes to mind - Tom Daley

Britain's poster boy is now 27 and a father, and will be taking part in his fourth Olympics - both in the Individual and Synchronised disciplines. Daley obviously has experience in abundance, but can he finally land the one to have evaded him, having won European and Commonwealth golds, but just two bonzes at the 2016 & 2012 Olympics.

Without doubt, Daley faces a hard task with China strong in the event, winning gold at three of the last five Olympics in the 10m Platform, plus the last four 10m Synchronized golds. Cao Yuan won a couple of golds at the last two Olympics (10m Synchro & 3m Springboard), plus three golds at the 2019 Worlds (3m Synchro & 10m Synchro), where favourite, Yang Jian, also took a couple of golds (10m Platform & Mixed Team). However, Daley will take heart from the fact he beat the aforementioned Jian at the 2017 World Aquatics Championships, and remains a man motivated by the arrival of his son.

VERDICT:

Tom Daley will be hoping for Olympic gold at last, but faces two tough competitors from China with better recent performances who'll probably fight it out for the podium's top spot.

Other Team GB's to watch:
Jack Laugher - 3m Springboard

EQUESTRIAN

Women's Individual Dressage

Dates: 30 July - 2 Aug  

Odds: 4-9 Isabell Werth (GER) (GER), 11-2 Charlotte Dujardin (GBR), 6-1 Dorothee Schneider (GER), Jessica von Bredow-Werndl (GER), 9-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Individual Dressage winners 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Charlotte Dujardin (GBR)

Isabell Werth (GER)

K Broring-Sprehe (GER)

2012

Charlotte Dujardin (GBR)

Adelinde Cornelissen (NED)

L Bechtolsheimer (GBR)

2008

Anky van Grunsven (NED)

Isabell Werth (GER)

H Kemmer (GER)

2004

Anky van Grunsven (NED)

Ulla Salzgeber (GER)

B Ferrer-Salat (ESP)

2000

Anky van Grunsven (NED)

Isabell Werth (GER)

Ulla Salzgeber (GER

Team Eventing

Dates: 30 July - 2 Aug

Odds: 6-4 Germany, 7-4 Great Britain, 9-2 New Zealand, 6-1 Australia, 9-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Team Eventing winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

France

Germany

Australia

2012

Germany

Great Britain

New Zealand

2008

Germany

Australia

Great Britain

2004

France

Great Britain

USA

2000

Australia

Great Britain

USA

Team Jumping

Dates: 30 July - 2 Aug

Odds: 15-8 Switzerland, 5-2 USA, 7-2 Great Britain, 6-1 Belgium, 7-1 Netherlands, 7-1 Ireland, 12-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Team Jumping winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

France

USA

Germany

2012

Great Britain

Netherlands

Saudi Arabia

2008

USA

Canada

Switzerland

2004

USA

Sweden

Germany

2000

Germany

Switzerland

Brazil

At last for racing fans, an Olympic sport involving horses, and an event in which Great Britain picked up plenty of medals.

Charlotte Dujardin
won Olympic gold at the last two Individual Dressage events, but the highly-experienced Isabell Werth, who took silver behind her in Rio, is heavily fancied after winning the 2018 World Championships (Dujardin took bronze) prior to adding the 2019 European Championship. The retirement of Valegro who played a big part in Rio was a loss, but the 10yo Gio is gaining more experience all the time. Dujardin's best chance of gold could come in the Team event where she joins up with Carl Hester who won the Team Dressage gold in 2012, though Germany remain a tough nut to crack, hence their 1-7 odds.

In the Team Eventing, 2018 World Champion Rosalind Canter is in the saddle alongside debutant Oliver Townend, and with Team GB landing three silvers during the last five Olympics they could get their head in front at last, where Germany again stand in the way.

Germany won't be much of a threat in the Team Jumping, however, where Great Britain have a very talented line-up featuring Ben Maher, Scott Brash and Oliver Townend.

Olympic gold medalist Ben Maher will be in Tokyo for the Team Jumping

Both Maher and Townend head to Tokyo in good form this year, while Brash took gold in 2012 along with Maher. They still have work to do judged on their 2019 European bronze, especially against rising force, Switzerland, who will prove the biggest challenge, along with 2018 World Champions USA.

VERDICT:

There should be medals for Team GB, but more of the silver and bronze colour than gold - the Germans in particular look very strong. There is such a fine line in this event, though, and one slip could change everything, therefore Ireland could enter the medals in the Team Jumping - an event they won European gold in 2017.

FOOTBALL

Men's U23s

Dates: 22 July - 7 August  

Odds: 2-1 Brazil, 11-4 Spain, 13-2 France, 8-1 Argentina, 9-1 Japan, 10-1 Germany, 16-1 Mexico, 20-1 bar

Previous Olympic Men's Football winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Brazil

Germany

Nigeria

2012

Mexico

Brazil

South Korea

2008

Argentina

Nigeria

Brazil

2004

Argentina

Paraguay

Italy

2000

Cameroon

Spain

Chile

Footy fans missing their fix action following Euro 2020 didn't have to wait long for another dose as the men's event got underway ahead of the Opening Ceremony on Wednesday (21 July). Sadly, Great Britain will not be represented in the men's, but they will in the women's - more on that later.

First up the men's, and for those wondering how the teams are made up, then players have to born from 1 January 1997, though each squad is allowed three players outside that restriction, including some familiar faces from Euro 2020.

One of the main facts to jump out when digging into the past winners of this event was that the majority fielded a star player - Neymar in 2016, Raul Jiminez in 2012, Lionel Messi in 2008, Carlos Tevez in 2004 and Samuel Eto'o in 2000. The message therefore is clear, and that the 2020 winners in Tokyo will need someone they can look to for a touch of class.

With that in mind, some punters may look to Spain, who boast the recent Euro 2020 Young Player of the Tournament Pedri, plus Pau Torres, Eric Garcia and Dani Olmo were also at Euro 2020. It remains to be seen if they'll be fresh enough and motivated following that tournament, though - they drew their opener with 0-0 with Egypt - which could see Brazil take advantage.

Richarlison scored a hat-trick for Brazil during their opening match of the 2020 Olympics

The Brazilians have a tremendous pedigree at the Olympics having won it on home soil in Rio five years ago, while taking silver in London. They also boast a world-class performer in Everton's Richarlison and welcome back the highly-experienced Dani Alves to steer the ship, along with Sevilla's experienced defender Diego Carlos. Then there is Ajax's Antony up front, Hertha BSC's Matheus Cunha and Arsenal's Gabriel Martinelli. Brazil also look to have the kinder draw if winning their group, and started with a bang 48 hours before the Opening Ceremony by beating Germany 4-2. 

Elsewhere, France have plenty of young talent coming through but may need more time and lost their opener 4-1 to Mexico, while Germany don't have much depth in their squad and lack quality with none of their domestic representatives coming from Bayern Munich or Borussia Dortmund. However, Japan shouldn't be written off on home soil, as they boast the likes of Sampdoria's centre back Maya Yoshida and Real Madrid's winger Takefusa Kubo - they also got off to a winning start on Wednesday by beating South Africa 1-0.

Women's U23

Dates: 21 July - 6 August  

Odds: 4-6 USA, 6-1 Netherlands, 8-1 Great Britain, 12-1 Sweden, 14-1 Japan, 16-1 Brazil, 20-1 bar

Previous Olympic Women's Football winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Germany

Sweden

Canada

2012

USA

Japan

Canada

2008

USA

Brazil

Germany

2004

USA

Brazil

Germany

2000

Norway

USA

Germany

While the men's tournament has an age restriction, the women's equivalent doesn't and therefore welcomes all players despite age and experience. The women's event is also ranked higher up the importance scale only behind the World Cup, so expect plenty of full strength teams.

Great Britain make only their second appearance at the Olympics having qualified as hosts in 2012 and made the quarter-finals before failing to send a squad to Rio in 2016. The 22-player British squad is made up of 19 English players, including the likes of Ellen White, Steph Houghton, Jill Scott, Fran Kirby and Lucy Bronze, so plenty of experience to call upon. For punters looking at form it could be worth sticking with England's results where they won only five of their last 14 games - they also had an interrupted prep and managed just one friendly (won 3-0 against New Zealand). The Three Lions were beaten twice by the US during that sequence but should make it out of their group, but getting past the likes of America and the Netherlands could be tough asks.

With no restrictions on which players can appear, the clear favourites are the United States, who had won 10 of their last 11 matches and remained unbeaten in 44 prior to a shock opening defeat against Sweden in the competition's opening round of games. The Swedes clearly hold a mental edge over the Americans, as they were also the last team to beat them on penalties in Rio, while drawing 1-1 with them in an April warm-up. Currently enjoying a 13-match unbeaten run, Sweden represent good odds at 5-1 as they'll know how to tackle Brazil should they clash later in the tournament.

Then there are the Netherlands, who have Barcelona's treble-winning midfielder, Lieke Martens and Arsenal's leading scorer, Vvianne Miedema, who scored six goals between them in Wednesday's thrashing of Zambia. The Dutch carried through their confidence to Tokyo having won their final match 7-0 against Norway in June, but they'll need to step up if meeting the US later in the tournament as they were convincingly beaten 2-0 by them in a November friendly.

VERDICT:

Punters have already enjoyed a heads-up with the football starting 48 hours ahead of the Opening Ceremony, with BRAZIL beating Germany 4-2. Star player, Richarlison netted a hat-trick and looks set for a good tournament, suggesting the 2-1 for the men in yellow to take gold makes sense. In the women's, Great Britain didn't get many opportunities to rehearse for Tokyo and their results remained below-par, but an opening 2-0 win against Chile should give them some of their mojo back. The Netherlands could bring more to the table and look sure to go well, but still have to produce something special if toppling the United States, who themselves need to bounce back from a shock opening defeat against SWEDEN, who now rate the best price for gold at 5-1.

GOLF

Men's

Dates: 28 July - 31 July; Course: Kasumigaseki Country Club; Weather: Hot and humid, possible showers

Odds: 5-1 Jon Rahm, 10-1 Colin Morikawa, 10-1 Xander Schauffele, 11-1 Justin Thomas,  11-1 Rory McIlroy, 12-1 Bryson DeChambeau, 14-1 Viktor Hovland, 18-1 Paul Casey, 22-1 Hideki Matsuyama, 25-1 bar

Previous Olympic Men's Golf winners

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Justin Rose (GBR)

Henrik Stenson (SWE)

Matt Kuchar (USA)

No event from 1906-2012

With golf only being reintroduced back into the Olympic programme in 2016, there will be plenty of interest in this year's renewal which features a  classy line-up in the men's including three of this year's major winners in Jon Rahm, Colin Morikawa and Hideki Matsuyama. The latter would of course love to follow-up his Masters win by landing the gold in his home country, while the American Morikawa arrives fresh from last weekend's glorious Open victory - his second major in just nine attempts. Then there is Spain's Rahm, who also won his first major at the U.S. Open and chased Morikawa hard when third at The Open. There is also Xander Schauffele, Bryson DeChambeau and Justin Thomas adding to a strong American line-up, while Ireland's Rory McIlroy & Shane Lowry will be pushing hard to bring back gold - Team GB rely on Paul Casey and Tommy Fleetwood as their main hopes.

VERDICT:

Not many of these will have played the course before, apart from in practice, so it's difficult to call on any previous course form, but one man who seems to apply his skills no matter where he plays at the moment is JON RAHM. The in-form Spaniard is enjoying a golden year in which he became a father and won his first major, while shaping at last weekend's Open as if he hasn't finished yet. Winning gold in Tokyo could truly seal a 'golden year'. 

HOCKEY

Men's

Dates: 24 July - 5 August

Odds: 11-4 Australia, Belgium, 11-2 Germany, Netherlands, 10-1 Argentina, Great Britain,  India, 33-1 bar

Previous Olympic Men's Hockey winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Argentina

Belgium

Germany

2012

Germany

Netherlands

Australia

2008

Germany

Spain

Australia

2004

Australia

Netherlands

Germany

2000

Netherlands

South Korea

Australia

Women's

Dates: 24 July - 6 August

Odds: 10-11 Netherlands, 13-2 Argentina, 7-1 Australia, Germany, 9-1 Great Britain, 12-1 New Zealand, 33-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Women's Hockey winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Great Britain

Netherlands

Germany

2012

Netherlands

Argentina

Great Britain

2008

Netherlands

China

Argentina

2004

Germany

Netherlands

Argentina

2000

Australia

Argentina

Netherlands

With the women's hockey team having taken gold in 2016 five years ago, it's understandable why expectations remain high for Tokyo, but that was five years ago and much has changed since, with only six of the 16-team squad surviving from Rio. That's not to take anything away from Team GB's memorable win against the Netherlands five years ago when winning a penalty shoot-out, but they'll face a much tougher Dutch team this time around, who won the 2018 World Cup. That's not to mention Argentina and Australia, who also required a shoot-out in the 2018 Worlds, before Australia lost to the Netherlands - again on penalties. Since 2018, Great Britain's record against the big guns shows as: 0-4 v Netherlands, 0-4 v Australia and 0-3 v Argentina.

In the men's, it's been a while since Team GB featured on the podium, though 'England' did scoop three straight bronzes in the Worlds (2018, 2014, 2010). Their spirits will have also been lifted following May's two wins over world No.5 side Germany following a dismal 2020 in which they lost seven of their eight matches. As with the women, Team GB's record against the big guns doesn't hold too well - since 2017, their record against Australia (World No.1) reads 2 wins from 7 meetings, Belgium (World No.2) stands at 1 win from 6 and the Netherlands (World No.3) is 1 win from 5.

VERDICT:

It will be tough for the Great Britain women to repeat their 2016 gold as they haven't been in great form since, while the Netherlands side they beat in Rio have improved since. It's a similar story with the men, whose recent record against the top-ranked countries suggests only a bronze, at best.

PENTATHLON

Men's

Dates: 5 August- 7 August

Odds: 9-2 Joe Choong (GBR), 5-1 Jun Woong-tae (KOR), 6-1 Valentin Prades (FRA), 9-1 Valentin Belaud (FRA), Adam Marosi (HUN), Alexander Lifanov (RUS), Fabian Liebig (GER), 16-1 bar

Previous Olympic Men's Pentathlon winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Russia

Ukraine

Mexico

2012

Czech Rep

China

Hungary

2008

Russia

Lithuania

Lithuania

2004

Russia

Lithuania

Czech Rep

2000

Russia

Hungary

Belarus

Women's

Dates: 5 August- 6 August

Odds: 3-1 Kate French (GBR), 5-1 Laura Asadauskaite (LIT),  15-2 Michelle Gulyas (HUN), 9-1 Anastasia Prokopenko (BLR), 10-1 Annika Schleu (GER), Joanna Muir (GBR)

Previous Olympic Women's Pentathlon winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Australia

France

Poland

2012

Lithuania

Great Britain

Brazil

2008

Germany

Great Britain

Belarus

2004

Hungary

Latvia

Great Britain

2000

Great Britain

USA

Great Britain

An event that features fencing, swimming, show jumping, running and shooting, the Pentathlon remains an Olympic sport in which no British man has ever claimed a medal in - but that could all change in Tokyo. Indeed, with the improving Joe Choong winning the 2019 World Cup gold in Tokyo, he looks set to go close on his return visit at this year's Olympics. Tenth at the 2016 Olympics when an inexperienced 21-year-old whose nerves got the best of him, he will be much more wiser this time around - for the record, the last five Olympic Pentathlon winners were aged 25-29, so Choong is now in his prime as a 26-year-old.

Great Britain's Joe Choong won the 2019 World Cup gold in Tokyo and bids for Olympic glory

Unlike the men's, the women's pentathlon remains an event in which Great Britain hold a tremendous pedigree, with Stephanie Cook winning it in 2000, prior to a bronze and two silvers subsequently. The betting suggests that record could continue with Kate French installed as 3-1 favourite and Joanna Muir 10-1. The experienced 30-year-old French took individual gold at the 2015 World Cup, to accompany numerous Team golds, while her fifth at the 2016 Olympics should put the world No.2 in good stead for Tokyo. A recent World Cup silver - where Muir was fourth - was another solid pointer for punters that she's in fine fettle ahead of her biggest assignment.

VERDICT:

Team GB boast both the favourites for the men and women's events, so there are high hopes of medals, and hopefully a gold. Of the main two hopes, JOE CHOONG and Kate French, then Choong could be the one who is still improving and approaches Tokyo in his prime.

ROWING

Men’s Coxless Four

Date: 24 July - 28 July

Odds: 10-11 Great Britain, 2-1 Australia, 10-1 Italy, 11-1 USA, 20-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Men's Coxless Four winners

2016

Great Britain

Australia

Italy

2012

Great Britain

Australia

USA

2008

Great Britain

Australia

France

2004

Great Britain

Canada

Italy

2000

Great Britain

Italy

Australia

Men's Coxed Eight

 Date: 25 July - 30 July

 Odds: 5-4 Great Britain, 7-4 Germany, 9-1 Netherlands, 9-1 Australia, 9-1 Romania, 16-1 bar.

 Previous Olympic Men's Coxed Eight winners

2016

Great Britain

Germany

Netherlands

2012

Germany

Canada

Great Britain

2008

Canada

Great Britain

United States

2004

United States

Netherlands

Australia

2000

Great Britain

Australia

Croatia

Lightweight Double Sculls

Date: 24 July - 29 July

Odds: 3-10 Paul O’Donovan & Fintan McCarthy (IRE), 7-1 Jason-Toby Osborne & Jonathan Rommelmann (GER), 15-2 Kristoffer Brun & Are Strandli (NOR), 9-1 Stefano Oppo & Pietro Ruta (ITA), 40-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Men's Lightweight Double Sculls winners

2016

France

Ireland

Norway

2012

Denmark

Great Britain

New Zealand

2008

Great Britain

Greece

Denmark

2004

Poland

France

Greece

2000

Poland

Italy

France

Great Britain really have ruled the waves when it comes to Rowing down the years.

Indeed, it remains one of Team GB's strongest events, with memories of Sir Steve Redgrave powering his way to gold on five occasions, in the process providing motivation for generations to come. Redgrave's legacy has been well and truly respected courtesy of numerous golds won at international competitions since, including at Rio five years ago. Redgrave will be cheering on Team GB in Tokyo, which includes the 10-11 favourites to win the Men's Coxless Pair who won both the World Rowing Cup and Europeans this year. Having won gold in this event for the last five Olympics, there will be huge expectation on Ollie Cook, Sholto Carnegie, Rory Gibbs and Matt Rossiter, who'll need to again hold off the mighty challenge of an Australian team who took silver behind Britain - they also recently called back some experienced rowers to try and finally pip the Brits.

The Men's Coxed Eight should also be a pulsating event to watch with Team GB looking to follow-up their Rio gold against Germany, who took silver. The Germans went into this year as strong favourites having enjoyed a successful winning spree, but Great Britain held them into fourth at this year's Europeans - a timely confidence-booster for Britain ahead of Tokyo.

The biggest chance Ireland have of gold in Tokyo comes via the Men's Lightweight Double Sculls where the hugely experienced duo of Paul O’Donovan & Fintan McCarthy, who already boast international gold medals, including the 2019 Worlds and remain unbeaten since. They won April's Europeans and should again take care of what Europe has to offer in Germany, Norway and Italy.

In the Women's Single Sculls, Ireland have another good chance of gold via Sanita Puspure - the Latvian-born 39-year-old who moved to Ireland in 2006. Puspure took both the 2018 and 2019 World Championships, but Hanna Prakatsen and Kara Kohler have emerged as two strong rivals, especially the former who won this year's World Cup of Rowing.

As for the Womens Lightweight Double Sculls, GB & NI's Emily Craig & Imogen Grant already scooped bronze at the 2019 and World Championships before getting closer with silver at last year's Europeans - progress that suggests they could take gold, but they'll have to beat a strong Netherlands pair who recently clocked the world's fastest time.

The Women's Coxless Pair sees Team GB's Helen Glover & Polly Swann hold real medal prospects at odds of 11-10 having won the 2021 European Rowing Championships, but they'll have to up their game if seeking gold against the World Champions, New Zealand, who also boast the world's best time.

VERDICT:

It will be a surprise if Team GB leave Tokyo without a gold, while Ireland should also get on the podium. As for a punt, then the Men's Coxless look strong, but are a shades of odds-on, unlike the Men's Coxed Eight, who put down a timely marker by beating their closest rivals Germany in April and are available at 5-4. 

RUGBY 7's

Men's

Dates: 26 July - 28 July

Odds: 9-4 New Zealand, 5-2 Fiji, 10-3 South Africa, 8-1 USA, 10-1 Australia, 12-1 Great Britain, 33-1 bar 

Previous Olympic Men's Rugby winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Fiji

Great Britain

South Africa

2016 inaugural event; Years 1900-1924 15-a-side

Recent form remains thin on the ground for the Rugby 7's owing to the pandemic preventing matches during the last 18 months, though as a gauge,  the current rugby 7's world standings show as:

1. New Zealand
2. South Africa
3. Fiji
4. Australia
5. England
6. France
7. USA
8. Canada
9. Argentina
10. Ireland

The last 'real' form to go on was at the 2020 Seven's World Series where New Zealand pipped Australia 17-14 in the final, having taken care of Fiji in the play-offs (17-5), though the two also clashed six times during a warm-up in May when the All Blacks won all six games. However, New Zealand were put in their place in June's Oceania 7's when Fiji beat them twice - 21-19 and 17-7 - winning all six tournament games in the process, including against Australia and an Oceania Men's 7's. Fiji how to be at their best in an Olympic year, which appears the case once more about a country for whom winning the gold means so much.

Fiji won the 2016 Olympic gold in Rio and look primed to go close again in Tokyo

Great Britain pushed Fiji hard when taking silver in 2016, and also tasted success of their own when landing the Europe Sevens Grand Prix Series in May. They fielded two sides in the Royals and Lions, where the former lifted the trophy by beating France in the final (33-17). They'll face a different calibre of competition in Tokyo, though, hence their odds of 12-1 for gold.

Team GB's women have more to do at 18-1 with New Zealand's Black Ferns odds-on at 2-7 to land gold.

VERDICT:

In only the second renewal of the Rugby 7's at the Olympics, FIJI will look to follow-up their Rio gold and currently hold all the aces, having beaten New Zealand twice this year. Considering such victories over their closest rivals, it's surprising to see the bookies making the pair similarly priced around 2-1, possibly because of the All Blacks' history within the game.

SAILING

Men's Finn

Dates: 25 Jul - 5 Aug

Odds: 2-1 Giles Scott (GBR), 9-4 Nicholas Heiner (NED), 4-1 Zsombor Berecz (HUN), 4-1 Josh Junior (NZ), 11-2 Joan Cardona (ESP), 14-1 bar.

Previous Olympic Men's Finn winners

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Great Britain

Slovenia

USA

2012

Great Britain

Denmark

France

2008

Great Britain

USA

France

2004

Great Britain

Spain

Poland

2000

Great Britain

Italy

Sweden

Womens 470 - Two-person Dinghy

Dates: 28 July - 4 August

Odds: 4-1 Ai Kondo & Miho Yoshioka (JPN), 4-1 Hannah Mills & Eilidh McIntyre (GBR), 4-1 Camile Lecointre & Aloise Retornaz (FRA), 9-2 Silvia Mas & Patricia Cantero (SPA), 10- bar  

Previous Olympic Mixed winners 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Great Britain

New Zealand

France

2012

New Zealand

Great Britain

Netherlands

2008

Australia

Netherlands

Brazil

2004

Greece

Spain

Sweden

2000

Australia

USA

Ukraine

Mixed Multihull - Nacra 17

Dates: 28 July - 3 August

Odds: 3-1 Ruggero Tita & Catterina Banti (ITA), 7-2 John Gimson & Anna Burnet (GBR), 7-2 Jason Waterhouse & Lisa Darmanim (AUS), 7-1 Quentin Delapierre & Manon Audinet (FRA), 9-1 bar  

Previous Olympic Mixed winners

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Lange & Saroli (ARG)

Waterhouse & Darmanim (AUS)

Zajac & Frank (AUT)

2016 inaugural event

Arguably the most weather-dependent sport of them all, the competitor's heading out for Tokyo's sailing events will be checking the conditions ahead of start time, which could be anything from light winds to a hefty breeze, effecting both the surf and currents. But, enough of the weather check, punters will be wanting to know who's in with a chance of landing gold, and whether Team GB will be among the medals.

Well, when it comes to the Womens 470 then Team GB have a good recent record, with Hannah Mills at the helm. However, she will be working with a different partner than in the previous two Olympics in Eilidh McIntyre, whose father, Mike, took gold at the 1988 Olympics. So far, the pair have clicked to good effect at the World Championships, taking silver (2017), bronze (2018) and gold (2019), though they managed only fifth at the 2021 renewal in March and have work to do on that performance. 

As for the Nacra 17, then John Gimson & Anna Burnet have real prospects of getting on the podium - and one that saw Argentina, Australia and Austria fill the top three places at the 2016 Games, and all three crews are present again. The 2018 world champions Italy, boast a pairing of Ruggero Tita & Catterina Banti, who also contribute to a strong line-up, though Gimson & Burnet boast a 2020 world crown of their own where they had two Australian crews back in second and third - the French were in fourth and both Italian crews were fifth and 18th; the 2016 Olympics champs Argentina were 10th.

In the men's events, Giles Scott took up the challenge of following in the legendary Ben Aislie's footsteps by winning the 2016 gold in Rio and holds solid prospects of a sixth straight gold for Team GB in the Finn. This will be Scott's last Olympics as the Finn discipline ends after Japan, and he remains in good form having competed in March's America's Cup, prior to a silver in April's European Championships - the same slot he filled in 2020 and both times behind gold medallist Zsombor Berecz. The two will lock horns once more in Japan, along with Nicholas Heiner, Josh Junior and Joan Cardona, but Scott knows how to peak at the right time and used May's World Championships - when ninth - to test equipment for the Olympics. He should be spot-on for Tokyo.

VERDICT:

Hannah Mills & Eilidh McIntyre are set to be thereabouts in the Womens 470, but will need to improve on their World Championship fifth from March. In the Nacra 17, Great Britain equipped to beat the crews they took care of in Geelong last year. GILES SCOTT will carry the burden of making it six straight golds in the Finn, but has prepared well and is primed to peak where it matters.

SKATEBOARDING

Women's

Date: 4 August

Odds: 6-4 Misugu Okamoto (JPN), 2-1 Sakura Yosozumi (JPN), 10-3 Sky Brown (GBR), 12-1 Kokona Hiraki (JPN), 14-1 bar.

Great Britain's youngest-ever Olympic competitor, Sky Brown, goes for gold in Skateboarding

A historic first Skateboarding event at an Olympics takes place in Tokyo, and it looks sure to attract plenty of attention with Great Britain's youngest-ever Olympic competitor, Sky Brown, taking her place aged just 13. The teenager - born in Japan - returns to take on the big Japanese trio in the betting, including Misugu Okamoto, who won the 2019 World Championship, Sakura Yosozumi, who took the 2018 renewal - note, the 2020 and 2021 haven't taken place. Brown did well in pushing the aforementioned pair hard by claiming bronze and was runner-up in May's Dew Tour Finals behind Yosozumi, where Okamoto was third. The pressure may not get to Brown as it might the home runners, though the judges scores could prove vital.

VERDICT:

The big three, Misugu Okamoto, Sakura Yosozumi & SKY BROWN, look set for battle once more, and Team GB's Brown will arrive in top form having just secured last weekend's X Games title in Colorado. She's creeping closer to Japan's top two all the time and if fate has a say, then this may be Brown's time to beat them, back in her country of origin.

SWIMMING

Men's 100m Breaststroke

Dates: 24 July - 26 July

Odds: 1-18 Adam Peaty (GBR), Arno Kamminga (NED), 22-1 bar

Previous Olympic 100m Breaststroke winners

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Great Britain

South Africa

USA

2012

South Africa

Australia

USA

2008

Japan

Norway

France

2004

Japan

USA

France

2000

Italy

USA

Russia

Men's 200m Freestyle & 200m Individual Medley

Dates: 25 July - 30 July

Odds:
200m Freestyle: 11-4 Duncan Scott (GBR), 10-3 David Popovici (ROM), 7-2 Danas Rapsys (LIT), 4-1 Tom Dean (GBR), 6-1 Martin Malyutin (RUS), 6-1 Katsuhiro Matsumoto (JPN), 8-1 bar.

200m Individual Medley: 6-4 Michael Andrew (USA), 9-2 Daiya Seto (JPN), 9-2 Duncan Scott (GBR), 6-1 Mitch Larkin (AUS), Kouske Hagino (JPN), 15-2 Chase Kalisz (USA), 9-1 bar.

Previous Olympic 200m Freestyle winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

China

South Africa

USA

2012

France

China/S Korea

--

2008

USA

South Korea

USA

2004

Australia

Netherlands

USA

2000

Netherlands

Australia

Italy

Previous Olympic 200m Individual Medley winners  (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

USA

Japan

China

2012

USA

USA

Hungary

2008

USA

Hungary

USA

2004

USA

USA

Trinidad

2000

Italy

USA

USA

There are a number of odds-on favourites in the swimming events, including one of Team GB's main hopes for gold in Adam Peaty, and the big American hope to replace legendary gold medallist Michael Phelps, Caeleb Dressel. Peaty will be very hard to beat as he remains the current Olympic champion with an Olympic and world records to boast of, while Dressel is set to follow in Phelp's footsteps by bagging a hatful of golds.

With both men so short in the betting, it could pay to look elsewhere, with the Men's 200m Individual Medley catching the eye. Team GB are well represented with Duncan Scott and Tom Dean. Scott was a double silver medallist in Rio five years ago, which gives him the experience needed for Tokyo, while his times on the clock read well - he remains the only swimmer in the line-up to have dipped below the magical 1:45 on more than one occasion this year. He also recorded the fourth-fastest time ever at the GB trials (1:44.47s) where fellow Brit Dean was runner-up - himself clocking a new PB with 1:44.58; back in third was Katsuhiro Matsumoto, with Martin Malyutin fourth.

Duncan Scott will carry Team GB's main hopes in the Men's 200m Individual Medley

The fly in the ointment, however, could be the incredible 16-year-old Romanian, David Popovici, who is getting faster all the time and smashed the Junior 100m world record at the Europeans earlier this month - a time that is sixth best in the world this year. Whether he can repeat that on the biggest stage against the men remains to be seen, but with no screaming spectators allowed to watch, that might help.

VERDICT:

Adam Peaty should take gold, but at cramped odds and with an improving Dutchman in Arno Kamminga getting closer, the Brit doesn't merit a bet. However, DUNCAN SCOTT does look good at 11-4 to continue his progress and land a first Olympic gold after two silvers in Rio. With teammate Tom Dean also pushing hard, he too could 'win a medal' at around 13-8.

TAEKWONDO

Men's 68kg - Featherweight

Date: 25 July

Odds: 7-5 Lee Dae-Hoon (KOR), 13-5 Bradly Sinden (GBR), 10-3 Mirashem Hosseini (IRI), 4-1 Zhao Shaui (CHN), 17-2 bar.

Previous Olympic Taekwondo 68kg winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Jordan

Russia

S Korea/Spain

2012

Turkey

Iran

USA/Afghanistan

2008

South Korea

USA

Turkey/Taipei

2004

Iran

Taipei

South Korea

2000

USA

South Korea

Iran

Women's +67kg - Heavyweight

Date: 27 July

Odds: 6-4 Bianca Walkden (GBR), 13-5 Zheng Shuyin (CHN), 9-2 Lee-Da-bin (KOR), 11-1 bar

Previous Olympic Taekwondo +67kg winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

China

Mexico

Great Britain/USA

2012

Serbia

France

Russia/Mexico

2008

Mexico

Norway

Great Britain/Brazil

2004

China

France

Venezuela

2000

China

Russia

Canada

Women's 67kg - Welterweight

Date: 26 July

Odds: 15-8 Nur Tatar (TUR), 4-1 Ruth Gbagbi (IVO), 4-1 Matea Jelic (CRO), 9-2 Lauren Williams (GBR), 5-1 Zhang Mengyu (CHN), 12-1 bar

Previous Olympic Taekwondo 67kg winners (countries)

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

South Korea

France

Ivory Coast/Turkey

2012

South Korea

Turkey

USA/Germany

2008

South Korea

Canada

France/Croatia

2004

China

Greece

South Korea

2000

South Korea

Norway

Japan

Women's 57kg - Featherweight

Date: 24 July

Odds: 10-11 Jade Jones GBR), 7-2 Lee Ah-reum (KOR), 11-2 Zhou Lijun (CHN), 6-1 Hatice Kubra Ilgan (TUR), 11-1 bar

Previous Olympic Taekwondo 57kg winners (countries) 

Year

Gold

Silver

Bronze

2016

Great Britain

Spain

Iran/Egypt

2012

Great Britain

China

France/Taipei

2008

South Korea

Turkey

USA/Croatia

2004

South Korea

USA

Mexico

2000

South Korea

Vietnam

Turkey

Bradly Sinden will be flying the flag in the men's Taekwondo and is Team GB's best chance according the bookies' odds of just over 5-2 to win the Featherweight gold. Sinden became GB's first World Champion two years ago when scrapping past the current favourite in Tokyo, Lee Dae-Hoon, in the semi-finals (24:23). The Korean has since avenged that defeat on two occasions (13:6 & 41:12), while this will be the 22-year-old Brit's first Olympics, where his family won't be present owing to restrictions.

Onto the women's events, and first up the Heavyweights, where Bianca Walkden heads the betting and will be keen to convert her 2016 Olympic bronze into gold. The three-time world champion was beaten by the eventual Olympic winner and current second favourite in Tokyo, Zheng Shuyin, in the Rio semi-finals, but already avenged that by beating Shuyin at the 2019 Worlds. The pair experienced some almighty battles down the years, with the current head-to-head 8-4 in Zheng's favour; Zheng won their last two encounters in 2019 following the Worlds. As for the third favourite, Lee Da-bin, then she too pushed Walkden hard, with the Brit leading the Korean 3-2 in head-to-heads.

As for the Welterweights, then South Korea dominated the event down the years, taking the gold medal in four of the last five Olympics, but the good news for Team GB is they aren't in the running this time around. That will also encourage Lauren Williams, who arrives in Tokyo with plenty of medals and experience, but will need to find her best having won only one gold from her last seven tournaments. The bronze medallist from 2016 (and silver in 2012), Nur Tatar, will be in Tokyo, and showed herself still capable when taking silver at the 2019 Worlds, where Williams exited in the last 32. Matea Jelic is also fancied in the betting, and defeated Williams in their last two meetings, including in this year's Europeans.

In the Featherweight division, plenty of eyes will be on dual Olympic champion, Jade Jones. Once again, she could face old rival, Eva Calvo Gomez, but there are plenty of others also breathing down Jones' neck including Lee Ah-reum, the 2017 world champion who Jones beat at the 2019 Worlds, where Zhou Lijun took bronze. Jones also demonstrated her wellbeing by beating Hatice Kubra Ilgan to take gold at April's Worlds, which puts her spot-on for Tokyo. If successful, Jones would become the first British woman to win three straight golds, which could motivate her, as she'll be without her family in Tokyo.

Jade Jones bids for a historic third consecutive Olympic Featherweight gold

VERDICT:

Bradly Sinden should go close in the Men's Featherweight but may have a hurdle to climb if meeting Lee Dae-Hoon, while both Bianca Walkden and Lauren Williams could go deep in the Women's Heavyweight/Welterweight divisions - preference only just for Walkden. However, when it comes to parting with some cash, then JADE JONES carries confidence in her attempt to create history by winning a third straight gold. She knows how to beat the rivals she'll face in Tokyo and warmed-up with European gold this year.

TENNIS

Men's

Date: 24 July - 1 August; Courts: Hard

Odds: 4-6 Novak Djokovic (SER), 7-2 Daniil Medvedev (RUS), 5-1 Stefanos Tsitsipas (GRE), 6-1 Alexander Zverev (GER), 7-1 Andrey Rublev (RUS), 50-1 Andy Murray (GBR)

Previous Olympic Men's Tennis winners 

2016

Andy Murray (GBR)

Juan Martin del Potro (ARG)

Kei Nishikori (JPN)

2012

Andy Murray (GBR)

Roger Federer (SWZ)

Juan Martin del Potro (ARG)

2008

Rafael Nadal (SPN)

Fernando Gonzalez (CHL)

Novak Djokovic (SER)

2004

Nicolas Massu (CHL)

Mardy Fish (USA)

Fernando Gonzalez (CHL)

2000

Yevgeny Kafelnikov (RUS)

Tommy Haas (GER)

Arnaud Di Pasquale (FRA)

Women's

Date: 24 July - 1 August

Odds: 6-4 Naomi Osaka (JPN), 7-2 Ashleigh Barty (AUS),

Previous Olympic Women’s Tennis winners 

2016

Monica Puig (PUE)

Angelique Kerber (GER)

Petra Kvitova (CZE)

2012

Serena Williams (USA)

Maria Sharapova (RUS)

Victoria Azarenka (BLR)

2008

Elena Dementieva (RUS)

Dinara Safina (RUS)

Vera Zvonareva (RUS)

2004

Justine Henin-Hardenne (BEL)

Amelie Mauresmo (FRA)

Alicia Molik (AUS)

2000

Venus Williams (USA)

Elena Dementieva (RUS)

Monica Seles (USA)

The good news for tennis fans is that both world No.1's in Novak Djokovic and Ashleigh Barty will be in Tokyo searching for gold when the first ball is served on 24 July. It is the world's No.2, Naomi Osaka, the Face of the Olympics, who will be looking to grab the headlines for her home nation.

This won't be the first time a host nation will look to it's biggest star on the world stage to deliver gold on the Olympic stage, with the likes of Carl Lewis (1984 Los Angeles), Cathy Freeman (2000 Sydney) and Mo Farah (2012 London) just three examples. That task falls to Osaka in Tokyo during the following weeks, as she attempts to win gold for Japan - in the process adding to her four Grand Slam titles. The latest of those came in February's Australian Open, prior to withdrawing from the French Open and missing Wimbledon in preparation for the Olympics.

Japan's Face of the Olympics, Naomi Osaka, practicing on Centre Court ahead of her bid for gold

The break will no doubt see Osaka line-up fresher than her rivals, but she will also be lacking form and match fitness, so it will be interesting to see how she performs in her opener. Her No.2 seeding obviously keeps her away from the recently-crowned Wimbledon champion, Ashleigh Barty, who herself will look to achieve a dream gold of her own. Indeed, the world No.1 arrives in terrific form, which could mean a 'dream final' for fans with Barty facing Osaka, but there is a strong supporting cast not to be overlooked in Aryna Sabalenka, Elina Svitolina and Karolina Pliskova to name just several. While Rio's 2016 winner was the unseeded Monica Puig (Puerto Rico), who beat the No.2 seed, Angelique Kerber in the final, the previous seven women's winners all came from the top 10 in seeds: 4-5-1-2-9-3-1. 

In the men's, past Olympic champions were seeded 2-3-2-10-5-1-NS-3, with the only shock in 1992 when the unseeded Marc Rosset took gold. Apart from that, the remaining winners were top 10 seeds, though only Andre Agassi obliged as the No.1 seed. Punters who follow trends may therefore choose to go against the recently-crowned Wimbledon champion, Novak Djokovic, on that basis, though the Croatian will be hard to stop in his quest for a 'Golden Slam', having won the Australian and French, Wimbledon already in 2021 - leaving both Olympics and U.S. Open as the two remaining tasks to complete. The question is whether it will catch up with him at some point, and if so, who could take advantage?

The bottom half of the draw may present the best opportunity for a player to avoid Djokovic and gain confidence in making the final - as Matteo Berrettini did at Wimbledon recently - and two names who could enjoy a nice path are the No.2 seed, Daniil Medvedev (4-1) and No.6 seed Pablo Carreno Busta (66-1). Both have good form on Hard Courts, with the former arriving in good form from Wimbledon, while the latter - to the contrary - didn't enjoy the grass and exited early, but may benefit in arriving fresh. A mention also has to go to double Olympic champion, Andy Murray, who can hopefully enjoy a good run.

With Djokovic taking so much out of the market at short odds of 8-13, Alexander Zverev (9-1) is also included in the betting plan at 9-1, despite being in Djokovic's top half of the draw. Djokovic leads 6-2 in head-to-heads, but Zverev enjoys a Hard surface and looked in decent shape when making the last 16 at Wimbledon.

VERDICT:

While there will be enormous pressure on Japan's leading lady NAOMI OSAKA to deliver, the absence of spectators could help take some of the heat off, and should the dream final occur against Ashleigh Barty - whom she leads 2-1 in head-to-heads on Hard Courts - then she'll also be freshest. A similar policy could apply in the men's, as Novak Djokovic's gruelling season could catch up with him at some point trying to achieve a 'Golden Slam', and the trio of ALEXANDER ZVEREV, DANIIL MEDVEDEV and PABLO CARRENO BUSTA could be on hand should fatigue become an issue for the odds-on jolly.

TRIATHLON

Men's

Date: 26 July

Odds: 10-3 Mario Mola (SPN), 10-3 Vincent Luis (FRA), 6-1 Kristian Blummenfelt (NOR), Alex Yee (GBR), 13-2 Jonathan Brownlee (GBR), 14-1 bar

Previous Olympic Men's Triathlon winners (countries) 

2016

Great Britain

Great Britain

South Africa

2012

Great Britain

Spain

Great Britain

2008

Germany

Canada

New Zealand

2004

New Zealand

New Zealand

Switzerland

2000

Canada

Germany

Czech Republic

Women's

Date: 27 July

Odds: 11-4 Katie Zaferes (USA), 10-3 Georgia Taylor-Brown (GBR), 4-1 Jessica Learmonth (GBR), Flora Duffy (BER), 13-2 Vicky Holland (GBR), 10-1 bar

Previous Olympic Men's Triathlon winners (countries) 

2016

USA

Switzerland

Great Britain

2012

Switzerland

Sweden

Australia

2008

Australia

Portugal

Australia

2004

Austria

Australia

USA

2000

Switzerland

Australia

Switzerland

Great Britain head into the Tokyo Triathlon with a good recent record having won the last two golds, along with a silver and bronze. Brothers Alistair and Jonathan Brownlee were responsible for those medals, with the former taking gold and passing the Olympic torch onto his brother to do likewise in Tokyo. However, Jonathan hasn't been in the greatest form in the World Triathlon Series (WTS) during recent years, suggesting a bigger challenge may come from Alex Yee, who made 8 WTS podiums from 24 starts, including a gold in Leeds last month. Yee will have several tough cookies to get past, however, in Mario Mola (WTS winner from 2016-2018), Vincent Luis (WTS winner 2019-2020) and Kristian Blummenfelt, but the 23-year-old Londoner looks capable of making the podium - chalked at 6-4 with the bookies.

Both the 2020 and 2019 world champions, Katie Zaferes and Georgia Taylor-Brown, line-up to take their place in Tokyo despite form and fitness concerns, suggesting the Women's Triathlon promises to be a really open affair, especially with Team GB providing several lively contenders. Indeed, with the likes of Jessica Learmonth and Vicky Holland on hand there could be a medal or two heading Britain's way, with Holland bringing home Team GB's first medal for this event in 2016. Learmonth meanwhile, also has medals to her name - mainly silver and bronze - and showed some fair form this year, unlike Holland.

VERDICT:

With no Alistair Brownlee to go for a third straight gold, Team GB will rely on a solid supporting  cast in an event that appears open. ALEX YEE is one of the Britain's entitled to be thereabouts on the podium, while the women boast a good team and should also feature.

MEDALS

Team GB's Previous Medals:

2016 Rio medals: 27 gold, 23 silver, 17 bronze: 67 total
2012 London medals: 29 gold, 17 silver, 19 bronze: 65 total
2008 Beijing medals: 19 gold, 13 silver, 19 bronze: 51 total
2004 Athens medals: 9 gold, 9 silver, 12 bronze: 30 total
2000 Sydney medals: 11 gold, 10 silver, 7 bronze: 28 total

While the number of medals remain on the rise for Team GB, they have not set any targets this time around owing to the pandemic which obviously took an effect on training and the number of athletes competing - Amber Hill was forced out in the build-up from the shooting owing to a positive Covid test.

But, for punters still looking to have a punt on Team GB's medal haul during the coming weeks, then the bookies offer 5-6 about 15 golds or more, with evens for 16 plus, and 5-1 for 20 or more.

As for which country will land the most golds, then the bookies envisage a done deal with USA 1-8 and China next at 7-1.

It therefore remains to say those immortal words...LET THE GAMES BEGIN! 

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